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OK, let’s admit it. 

When the rains come to Malibu, people freak out.

“There’s water coming out of the sky, freak out!” they’ll say. 

Of course, when we live in a town where 90 percent of the days are filled with beauty, sun and surf, we can easily forget that weather of another kind actually exists. But when it does come, you want to be prepared by pondering this week’s Ride of the Week.

Ashleigh Fryer

With less than a month until Christmas and only a couple weeks until Hanukkah, the holiday shopping season is upon us. For those looking to give local gifts this holiday season, Malibu Surfside News is here to help.

Below are 70 great gift ideas in no particular order from Malibu businesses that are fit for just about anyone on your list. Happy shopping!

1. Zuma Organics Herb Tins

Chris Bashaw

Rick Metzler, chief instructor at The Pit Malibu, likes to think his 14-year-old son, Sage, was sensing the rhythms and patterns associated with Cacoy Doce Pares Eskrima stick fighting while still in his mother’s womb.

“Sharine was earning her second-degree brown belt at the time, so she was fighting, doing rolls and sparing with sticks while she was pregnant with Sage,” Rick said. “You can hear things in the womb, and there’s a lot of rhythm, motion and patterns that are associated with the Eskrima system.”

Ashleigh Fryer

The Miss Malibu Pro Women’s Longboarding Invitational debuted at Surfrider Beach in Malibu  Aug. 9-10. 

The first-place title of Miss Malibu Pro was awarded to Kaitlin Maguire of Oceanside, California. Maguire not only won the final, but also earned the Wave of the Day award and cash prize from Jericho Poppler for scoring a perfect 20 in her semi final. 

Runner-up was awarded to Makayla H. Smith.

Ashleigh Fryer

With a quick motion, a pair of yellow-green eyes — each with a black, vertical slit — came into view against a dark brown chair in Bank of Books Malibu.

The form of Malibu resident Karen Smythe’s feline friend, Kool Kat — who is black in color — soon became apparent as he quietly sat above Rachel Hasserling, who was reading a book to her children; Hasserling’s young son, Caleb, reached over to stroke Kool Kat’s back.

Chris Bashaw

Hip-hop music and environmental awareness merged at a post-Earth Day celebration at the Malibu Library on Friday, April 25. 

Archie Hill, founder of Third Rock Hip-Hop, presented a video version of the first four chapters of his upcoming five-chapter book, “Third Rock and Friends: A Trip to the Beach” to a crowd of about 25 children from Juan Cabrillo Elementary School.

Chris Bashaw

A born and bred New Yorker, current Malibu resident Ita Olsen learned at an early age the persuasive power of speech and inflection.

“When I was 14, I knew I had a New York accent,” Olsen said, laughing. “I remember talking to my teachers, my classmates, everyone around me, and trying to categorically improve my accent. I did it systematically. Years later that was what helped me design my own program.”

Chris Bashaw

For a few hours following the highest night tide of each full or new moon during spring and early summer, the California grunion leave the water to lay their eggs on Southern California’s sandy beaches from Point Conception north of Santa Barbara to Punta Abreojos in Baja California, Mexico.

Chris Bashaw

Structural engineer Dave Weiss thought getting planning approval for a repair to a broken pile on a client’s beachfront home in Malibu was going to be an in-and-out process.

After all, with the broken timber, the home was unstable and in danger. A slightly larger (15 inches in diameter, up from 12) concrete pile was sounder, safer and more efficient, according to Weiss, who owns an engineering firm specializing in repair to homes suffering structural damage from the ocean.

Ashleigh Fryer

After more than 25 years in business, Lily’s Café has changed very little – if at all.

Tucked in a nook at the Point Dume Village across the walkway from Bank of Books, the cozy café was originally a doughnut shop until the early 1980s, when an 18-year-old Lily Castro acquired the venue and began its transition to a restaurant. 

“Little by little, I made this place a restaurant by adding burritos, hamburgers and tacos to our menu,” Castro said. “My vision was to make this restaurant a family business, and it worked.”

Chris Bashaw

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