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Malibu resident Karen Smythe is celebrating the release of her first children’s book, “Fredrick the Butterfly.”
Although set for full release on July 21, copies can be purchased directly from Christian-based publisher, Tate Publishing.
Smythe didn’t want to give away the story, but said it was inspired when she and her young daughters rescued a butterfly from the Jersey Shore 25 years ago.

Chris Bashaw

Bill Miller, owner of Malibu Kitchen, likes things a certain way.

“What’s my go-to order?” he said. “I take grilled chicken with some prosciutto, put some truffle cheese in there, add pesto and a little mustard in a whole wheat wrap. I melt that together then I add cold coleslaw and roasted tomatoes.”

The meticulous nature of Miller’s taste buds has earned Malibu Kitchen special distinction as one of the only eateries in Malibu to make it to its 14th birthday, which Miller is celebrating this week. 

Ashleigh Fryer

After a 10-year legal dispute, a hotly contested Carbon Beach accessway is officially open to the public.

In the 1980s, before Malibu was incorporated as a city, the California Coastal Commission issued two development permits to Lisette and Norman Ackerberg, allowing for the construction of a house, pool, tennis court, and a 140-foot long seawall on the couple’s Carbon Beach properties. The permit required dedication of a public pathway to the beach as a condition of construction. The house was built, the beach access was not. 

Alex Vejar

While the Malibu Arts Festival enjoyed its 44th anniversary on July 25, several artists in the fray of tents, food trucks and art enthusiasts introduced themselves to the community for the first time. 

Cameron Jordan, an abstract painter and photographer by profession, shared her thoughts on being a first-timer at the festival.  

Alex Vejar

The sign welcoming visitors to Malibu describes this stretch of rugged coast and its dramatic mountain backdrop as “27 miles of scenic beauty.” To earthquake researcher Robert de Groot, the landscape of the Santa Monica Mountains isn’t a peaceful picture postcard. Instead, it tells a story of violent geologic upheaval. 

Alex Vejar

Tony Barrera was born in Lyons, Kansas in 1964 and moved to Malibu with his family in 1973 where he spent his childhood/teenage years growing up. Tony played baseball for Malibu Little League and was a great and still talked about catcher. He loved surfing, film making and had a great passion for playing the drums. In Tony’s teenage years, he worked at Trancas Restaurant and The SandCastle as a cook and would be known in later years for his amazing culinary talents. 

Ashleigh Fryer

“His was a voice that had its own footnotes,” Douglas Kmiec, Our Lady of Malibu parishioner, said with a laugh that reverberated through the crowd that filled the movie theater, as his fellow parishioners and neighbors watched Kmiec on screen at the premier of “Radical Kindness: The Life of John Sheridan,” a film documenting OLM’s Mongsignor, the late John V. Sheridan. 

Ashleigh Fryer

Malibu resident Josh Waldbaum looked down at the Rolex watch clasped to his wrist one day in 2008. Just days before, the item served as a testament to his success as a private fitness trainer, his social status and his worth. It was now worthless to him.

“I had no job, I had nowhere to live and I had about $100 in the bank,” Waldbaum said. “I thought, ‘All this watch does is tell time. I’ll make my own watch.’”

Ashleigh Fryer

An elderly man was in stable condition Saturday, June 20, after being stabbed during a Malibu home invasion incident the night before, according Los Malibu/Lost Hills Sheriff’s Station.
At 10:50 p.m. Friday, June 19, the Malibu/Lost Hills station received a call from the Los Angeles County Fire Dispatch advising that they were responding to an apartment unit in the 20700 block of Pacific Coast Highway, Malibu to treat a possible stabbing victim.

Chris Bashaw

Jillina Carlano and a cast of 30 professional belly dancers sway in time with the sheer white curtains that billow atop a light ocean breeze, connecting the natural movements of their bodies with the natural exhale of the Pacific Ocean. 

“Working in this space, being so connected to the beauty of the environment, is unique to any place in the world,” Carlano said. “Where else would we possibly want to be.”

Chris Bashaw

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