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It’s often important to remember your roots and not forget where you came from. It’s something the owners and staff at Malibu Cafe at Calamigos Ranch believe in firmly, as they use the cafe’s menu as a way to acknowledge the cowboy lifestyle the Malibu ranch was once known for. 

“It’s super casual here and our menu is very country kitchen,” said Valentino Caceres, general manager of Malibu Cafe. 

Ashleigh Fryer

In the same room on Galahad Drive where 16-year-old Barbie Herron and Amber Laforet began their friendship, 22 years later, the pair returned to fill the space with a new set of memories, this time as business partners and co-founders of Head Regal.
“That room where I lived with Barbie for a summer when we were 16 became our first office,” Laforet said. “Basically, our business was born in one night over sushi. We came back into each other’s lives after all these years and we just absolutely connected — it was magnetic.”

Chris Bashaw

Before chef Thommy Craig took over as executive chef at Vintage Grocers this summer, he spent the past 30 years building a name for himself as a personal chef for celebrity clientele. But Craig’s first gig in the kitchen was the far less glamorous role of a dishwasher.

Alex Vejar

Malibu resident Tova Fagan said jewelry design came to her on her birthday eight years ago in Las Vegas.

“I was celebrating with my family when we walked by a particular shop with a bracelet in the window,” she said.

The bracelet transfixed Fagan with its thoughtfully beaded pattern and a diamond charm dangling from its center. Its only off-putting component was the “ginormous” sum of money scrawled on its price tag.

Ashleigh Fryer

Throughout a range of interviews conducted with Malibu residents and professionals, evidence suggested many in the Malibu community hold the City of Malibu’s Planning Department in low esteem.

Included in those interviews were several “on record,” “on condition of anonymity” and “no comment,” conversations that occurred between the Malibu Surfside News and more than 20 people – the majority of whom were unwilling to go on the record.

Ashleigh Fryer

A small fire was extinguished by 8:20 p.m. at the Shell gas station near the intersection of Pacific Coast Highway and Cross Creek Road in Malibu.

Shortly before 8 p.m., a sedan collided with a pump at the gas station, igniting a small fire that was contained to the front of the vehicle.

A female passenger of the sedan said she and a male driver were driving in the right lane on the northbound side of Pacific Coast Highway when a taxicab began to move into their lane.

Chris Bashaw

Long time Malibu resident, (Jack) John T. Corrodi Jr. passed away on Jan. 24. He was surrounded by his wife, 16 adopted children and grandchildren.

Jack was born on July 24, 1935 in Columbus, Ohio. Jack was the child of John and Lucille Corrodi. Jack attended college at Wesleyan University in Middletown, Connecticut and graduated from Harvard University in 1963 with an MBA in business.

Ashleigh Fryer

Malibu native and daredevil Johnny Strange, 23, died after a wingsuit accident Thursday, Oct. 1, in Switzerland.

According to TMZ — as well as an earlier  telephone interview Strange gave on KROQ 106.7’s Kevin and Bean show last Monday — Strange said he would be filming a “dangerous wingsuit proximity video,” where “we fly super close to stuff.

Details of Strange’s accident were not yet known, but a wingsuit proximity flight is an advanced technique using a full-body suit to glide across the air — much like a bat.

Chris Bashaw

Dick Van Dyke performed with the Vantastix at a benefit performance and fan art exhibit on Friday, Oct. 2, at the Malibu Playhouse.

The show of shows was on as audience members became enthralled by the evening’s performances.

The paint was flying on and off the canvas and a puppeteer pulled the strings as his puppet floated in air. Van Dyke took the stage with his a cappella quartet, as his wife joined him. 

Van Dyke was at the top of his game — laughing, singing and involving the audience in the night’s festivities.

Alex Vejar

After more than 25 years in business, Lily’s Café has changed very little – if at all.

Tucked in a nook at the Point Dume Village across the walkway from Bank of Books, the cozy café was originally a doughnut shop until the early 1980s, when an 18-year-old Lily Castro acquired the venue and began its transition to a restaurant. 

“Little by little, I made this place a restaurant by adding burritos, hamburgers and tacos to our menu,” Castro said. “My vision was to make this restaurant a family business, and it worked.”

Chris Bashaw

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