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Long time Malibu resident, (Jack) John T. Corrodi Jr. passed away on Jan. 24. He was surrounded by his wife, 16 adopted children and grandchildren.

Jack was born on July 24, 1935 in Columbus, Ohio. Jack was the child of John and Lucille Corrodi. Jack attended college at Wesleyan University in Middletown, Connecticut and graduated from Harvard University in 1963 with an MBA in business.

Ashleigh Fryer

Malibu resident Mark Jason looked out onto 100 acres of raw land just southeast of Puerto Vallarta, Mexico. It was his newest business venture with his longtime friend and Mexican national Manuel. The only question: what to do with it.

“The first thing we bought was a chipper — we really transformed it into some beautiful farmland,” Jason said. “It was more than that, though. We wanted it to be a way to help people around there.”

Ashleigh Fryer

Malibu High School baseball coaches Ari Jacobs and Phil Johnson served a one-game suspension on Thursday, April 23, amid an administrative investigation into incidents that allegedly occurred during a spring break tournament in San Diego. The team has also be prohibited from attending overnight tournaments for the next two years.

Chris Bashaw

Malibu resident Diane Prince has no apprehension to say she wears the same clothes as her 11-, 13- and 15-year-old daughters. 

In fact, she believes that is the beauty of her women’s contemporary clothing company Winnie & Kat — it empowers women not just to own their style, but to own their independence, as well.

“All three of my daughters wear the pieces differently,” Prince said. “And that’s part of the fun — seeing how everybody translates their own style. That’s the biggest reason I started [Winnie & Kat]; I knew my daughters were watching me.”

Ashleigh Fryer

On March 3, Malibu’s historic Adamson House and Museum temporarily closed its doors. California State Parks, which owns and administers the house and museum as part of Malibu Lagoon State Beach, initially announced that “the house tours program, garden tours, and the gift shop would be temporarily closed from March 3 through March 31, 2015.” That deadline passed two weeks ago, and a notice on the Adamson House website that states that the house will be “closed until further notice,” has raised concerns in the community that the closure may become permanent. 

Ashleigh Fryer

Malibu attorney and resident Paul Shoop passed away peacefully on May 16 at St. Johns Hospital in Santa Monica. He was 67 years old. Paul was a loving father and will be missed by his wife of 32 years, Lee, and his six children. 

Chris Bashaw

A common adage says it takes a village to raise a child, and it’s not far-fetched to think the same for a small business – a small village, or a close-knit town such as Malibu, may be exactly what it takes to get a small business off the ground.

That’s at least the experience of Ann Ryan, a Malibu resident of nearly 20 years, who, with her daughter Beth Levine, started what is now Beachy Cream Organic Ice Cream.

Chris Bashaw

Storm drains are those slits along the side of the road that make people who are texting grip their cell phones a little tighter as they walk by.

They’ve probably swallowed more bouncy balls, keys, coins and small toys than anyone can count, but storm drains consume far more than the things we wish to hold on to.

Ashleigh Fryer

A 29-year-old man was prounounced dead at Zuma Beach on Sunday, July 11, said Kenichi Haskett, ocean lifeguard captain in the lifeguard division of the Los Angeles Fire Department.

At approximately 3:45 p.m., four people were caught in an ocean rip current between Zuma towers 8 and 9. Lifeguards already in the water attempted to rescue them, Haskett said. 

The 29-year-old man began flailing in the water, an indication he did not know how to swim, Haskett said. He was submerged seconds later, Haskett said. 

Alex Vejar

After more than 25 years in business, Lily’s Café has changed very little – if at all.

Tucked in a nook at the Point Dume Village across the walkway from Bank of Books, the cozy café was originally a doughnut shop until the early 1980s, when an 18-year-old Lily Castro acquired the venue and began its transition to a restaurant. 

“Little by little, I made this place a restaurant by adding burritos, hamburgers and tacos to our menu,” Castro said. “My vision was to make this restaurant a family business, and it worked.”

Chris Bashaw

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