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Jillina Carlano and a cast of 30 professional belly dancers sway in time with the sheer white curtains that billow atop a light ocean breeze, connecting the natural movements of their bodies with the natural exhale of the Pacific Ocean. 

“Working in this space, being so connected to the beauty of the environment, is unique to any place in the world,” Carlano said. “Where else would we possibly want to be.”

Chris Bashaw

When wildlife biologist Stan Gehrt set out to study coyotes in Chicago, Illinois he thought it would be a quick “one-and-done” situation. He was wrong. Almost two decades of research on Cook County, Illinois’ coyotes — estimated to number not one or two, but 1500-2000 — continues to yield astonishing data about the lives and habits of this intelligent, ingenious and seldom seen urban carnivore. 

Ashleigh Fryer

On March 3, Malibu’s historic Adamson House and Museum temporarily closed its doors. California State Parks, which owns and administers the house and museum as part of Malibu Lagoon State Beach, initially announced that “the house tours program, garden tours, and the gift shop would be temporarily closed from March 3 through March 31, 2015.” That deadline passed two weeks ago, and a notice on the Adamson House website that states that the house will be “closed until further notice,” has raised concerns in the community that the closure may become permanent. 

Ashleigh Fryer

Malibu resident Karen Smythe is celebrating the release of her first children’s book, “Fredrick the Butterfly.”
Although set for full release on July 21, copies can be purchased directly from Christian-based publisher, Tate Publishing.
Smythe didn’t want to give away the story, but said it was inspired when she and her young daughters rescued a butterfly from the Jersey Shore 25 years ago.

Chris Bashaw

Tony Barrera was born in Lyons, Kansas in 1964 and moved to Malibu with his family in 1973 where he spent his childhood/teenage years growing up. Tony played baseball for Malibu Little League and was a great and still talked about catcher. He loved surfing, film making and had a great passion for playing the drums. In Tony’s teenage years, he worked at Trancas Restaurant and The SandCastle as a cook and would be known in later years for his amazing culinary talents. 

Ashleigh Fryer

Malibu resident Josh Waldbaum looked down at the Rolex watch clasped to his wrist one day in 2008. Just days before, the item served as a testament to his success as a private fitness trainer, his social status and his worth. It was now worthless to him.

“I had no job, I had nowhere to live and I had about $100 in the bank,” Waldbaum said. “I thought, ‘All this watch does is tell time. I’ll make my own watch.’”

Ashleigh Fryer

As the organizer of Malibu’s Dry Gulch Theatre of Anarchy, Tommi Trudeau’s Monday evenings are filled with entertainment in the most unexpected of places.

“You can get up there and tell us what you had for lunch if you want to,” Trudeau said, laughing. 

“And we’ll sit there and think, ‘Hmmm, delicious! But I shouldn’t be eating that,’” added Trish Van Devere, Dry Gulch Theatre member and seasoned actress. 

Ashleigh Fryer

Spring is in bloom in Malibu, despite the drought. Although it isn’t one of those stellar years when wide swaths of the Santa Monica Mountains are transformed into a living tapestry of color, there are still many places to experience the sight and scent of spring flowers.

Ashleigh Fryer

Steve Steere was in his 90th year, when he passed away on Oct. 20, 2014.  A Malibu resident for 54 years, Stephen Douglas Steere was a Southern California native, born in Santa Monica on June 20, 1925.  His parents, Fred and Gertrude (Gigi) Steere, moved from London, Ontario, Canada, where his two older sisters were born. He was the first in his family to be born in California, followed by his younger sister and brother. His father was known for running Wilson’s Sporting Goods on 3rd Street and Wilshire in Santa Monica.

Ashleigh Fryer

For a few hours following the highest night tide of each full or new moon during spring and early summer, the California grunion leave the water to lay their eggs on Southern California’s sandy beaches from Point Conception north of Santa Barbara to Punta Abreojos in Baja California, Mexico.

Chris Bashaw

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